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released a story about -- the washington post released a story about what they called the black budget. it says u.s. intelligence services carried out 231 cyber operations in 2011, a theater of fined seven times in war, according to classified documents obtained by the post. it provides new evidence that the obama administration's
>> tonight we start at the beginning, exploring the life and times of martha washington. >> martha washington was george washington's confidant. >> she was a person very absorbed in duty and very capable. but she didn't like that. she called herself a prisoner of state. >> by the same token that every step washington took to find the office, so in a very real sense kit be said everything martha washington did like wise. >> it was a business-like relationship, but not i think without affection. i think they had deep respect and affection for each other. >> it was as close to her how many town. she would own most of this block going back a couple acres, which mean she owned a huge chunk of what williamsburg was. there was a lot of tragedy in martha washington's life, she lost her first husband. she was raised a rich woman. now, what that means in 18th century is not familiesly what it means today. >> when she marries george washington she brings with her to mount vernon 12 house slaves, and that is really almost an unimaginable luxury. >> it takes her 10 days to travel here to valley
iteration is. we have a lot of acronyms and washington. it is a database that is different from the nsa database
quick final question from julie the road from mt. verse non and washington's port city. hello. >> george washington and george may sorry were very good friends. two wives, had anne, and she passed away. and then sara. wondering what the relationship was between martha and either of george mason's wives? >> they were friendly neighbors know, they never became intimate friends. friendship was a political casualty. but after the constitutional onvention, which, of course, washington sanctioned and mason it spelled in , many ways an end to their friendship. twitter, george and martha washington, quite the power couple. we close out bringing us full circle, what are the important things for people to the influence of martha washington. >> i think it's important to powerful she and on and how dependent he was her. his achievements were his achievements. him aving her there with made them much more possible. >> i think that's true. defined influence in a way that perhaps contemporary have difficulty understanding. but the fact of the matter is, she was the most influential of the earth face w
a jokesly washington event. are told. looks like a lot of comedy. >> anything wrong with that? really.ot i think the reference he was making was to andrea mitchell and alan greenspan's wedding that had been held around then. they are a power couple. andrea mitchell is a great journalist. alan greenspan is one of our most powerful economic minds in the last decade. it is an interesting dynamic when you have this crossover between friendship and social life. the president of the motion picture association told you he would never lobby. >> he did. i think what chris dodd is theemented in this book is impermanent feudal class, which is a term that tom coburn uses. it is used to describe the impermanent of washington. a lot of elected officials go on to become lobbyists and consultants. frankly, life is pretty good inside the belt. >> let's watch this. >> "this town." >> mark leibovitch. >> "this town." >> d.c. is described as inflated by big-money. a humanor schumer -- ladle in the local soap celebration buffet. wow, mark. all kinds of reaction. taking down the preening egos of this town. the
of reaction. >> they are taking down the preening egos of this town. the washington post. >> i hear there is no index. we cannot find out what is going on in this work. >> this book was so widely anticipated in washington as a screaming indictment. >> washington has created a bootleg index. >> your colleague suggested the notion of the composition -- >> everyone is talking about the book. everybody thinks they are in it. >> why are people that you wrote about so happy about this book? >> beats me. what is interesting, a lot of what you are seeing there was done before we saw the book. the speculation took on a life of its own. look. it is nice to have a book the bull are talking about, and obviously what happens is people focus on who is up, who is down, what news has broken. ultimately -- i do know what people to miss the more serious point. washington is doing very, very well in a very gilded age in some ways while the rest of the country is suffering. >> any reaction you have had to the book, surprising? >> not really. look, when you write a book, a lot can go wrong. that is the
at film from august of 1963 as demonstration and marchers gathered on the mall here in washington d.c. this was the headline from the washington post, a mammoth rally of 200,000 jamming the mall in a solemn orderly plea for equality. that's our line for those of you over the age of 50. for those of you under the age of 50. 585-3880. 202 is the area code here in washington d.c. we'll get your call on march. >> your calls and comments in a moment. lots get to the other stories this morning that is latest development from syria and headlines from overseas. the guardian newspaper the attack on syria just days away as the house of commons recalled for a vote and the picture of the british prime minster as he departs yesterday as the parliament resuming session tomorrow breaking from their august recess. from the marine herald, -- miami herald, a stage is set. u.s. and allies act as syria's intelligence mount. as u.s. officials said privately that a flood of previously undisclosed intelligence including satellite images and intercepted communication erased last minute administration doubt
now, it just looked like a very friendly almost clubby washington event. jokes are told that looked like a lot of comedy. that's what i saw. >> anything wrong with that? >> no, not really. >> talking -- i think the reference they were making was andrea mitchell and al greenspan's wedding that had been held around then. look, they're a power couple. andrea mitchell is a great journalist and alan greenspan is one of the most powerful economic minds and forces in the last few decades. 's an interesting dynamic. had the crossover in the friendship between professional and social life and so forth. >> you write in there for instance, chris dodd, a senator then, now works for the professional picture association he wouldn't lobby. >> he did. now he's head of the most powerful lobbying organizations in washington. what it's emblem mattic of was this fuel class. it sort of described the permanence of washington, the fact that people come here -- they almost always say now a lot of elected officials go on to become lobbyists and consultants and frank is good inside the beltway. >> here's som
washington martha. she was always called patsy as lady bird johnson was never called claudia. so i was just wondering, you mentioned in his letters when he referred to her in his letter that it was just mentioned on the telephone that he did call her patsy. and i also wanted to mention that in the story that i'm reading about martha and george washington that the house, mt. vernon, was originally the home of his half brother, george washington's half brother. that he lived in a smaller farm. and i wondered if you are going to talk anything about his years as a surveyor or is this really about the years with martha as an adult? >> thank versus much. this is actually martha washington's time in the sun. so we won't talk about george's early career. what about the nickname patsy? >> patsy, pat, patty were the nicknames for martha in those days just as peg or peggy is a nickname for margaret. the martha nickname has fallen out of favor. nobody was named patricia back then. the only patsies were martha's. that was simply the common name. >> the smaller farm she's reference ing? >> smaller, it wa
. thatth the announcement "the washington post" has been sold to jeff bezos, we thought we would take this opportunity to look at changes in the newspaper industry and the potential future of the news industry in general. we have two guests joining us this week. we want to introduce you to alan mutter. insulting,spaper lecturer at the university of california-berkeley on media consultant, lecturer at the university of california-berkeley on media economics. also joining us from our new york studio is edmund lee, the media reporter for bloomberg news. mr. lee, if we could start with you. how big a deal is this sale? in secularig deal terms, at least. in terms of numbers and finance, $250 million is not a lot of money. compared to other media deals, it is pretty small. it is more the fact that it is "the washington post," the storied newspaper. and jeff bezos, on the other side of the country, who is a well-known internet billionaire. despite the fact that he tends to be press shy. it is the secular interest of the big names behind it. interest in this deal outside of washington and out
economy. they are making huge investments. one of the problems in washington is due to the tea party. the tea party wants to have a sequester an across-the-board cuts. with to stop that mentality. we are investments to infrastructures -- we have to stop that mentality. we have to make investments to infrastructure. development, we have used our strack structure -- our tax structure to bring back jobs from overseas. chinese used cap structured and subsidies to encouragement and faxing. manufacturing can come back to unite states, but we have to encourage it. companies cannot move their money overseas. companies will stay here and ofufactured here because transportation cost. we're not doing that. we have to make a difference. >> that let me to where i want to go. there are those who say that it is time for america to do something to jumpstart our economic recovery. 162,000 jobs disappointed wall street. we had to do something with our tax code to reflect the need of a modern-day economy. i harken back to the days when i was a young reporter covering bill bradley who came up with the f
by side with james compilingelping him. and arranging his papers. >> she moved back to washington d.c. in her elder years and became very much behind the scenes in a political field again. >> as henry clay famously said, everybody loves mrs. madison. her equally famous response "that's because mrs. madison loves everybody." >> dolley madison came to her service as first lady with experience during thomas jefferson's two terms. the president often called on her to assist him. this sense of the usefulness of diplomacy allowed dolley to hit the ground wanting when she assumed the role in 1809 as her husband james madison became andpresident.good evening welcome. tonight we will learn about the intriguing dolley madison. we have two guests at our table. let me introduce you to them. catherine allgor, an author and biographer of dolley madison. and a historian. one of her books is called "a perfect union." thank you for being here. edith mayo was the creator of the first lady's exhibit at the smithsonian. so many smithsonian visitors have seen this throughout the years. thank you for bei
. definitionging the of cancelable reduce unnecessary treatments. washington journal is live tomorrow. will be back here with the c- span townhall tomorrow looking at immigration and the economy live at 7:00 eastern. thank you for joining us this evening. session two of first ladies and ladies, influence image begins. all this month we are showing encore presentations of season one. programs on every first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. tonight, it is doubly medicine. -- dolly madison. >> dolley was socially adept and politically savvy. >> she was his best friend. she compensated. >> james madison wishes to meet her. >> she carved out a space for women where they can wield a great deal of political power. >> dolley madison would sit at the head of the table and erect the conversation. >> she got these people to the white house and entertained them. got them together and got them talking. >> this was important to her to make everyone feel welcome. >> it was considered her classic look. people noticed it. >> it was a perfect setting for james and dolley madison >> she sat side by side w
. >> and potentially shut down the government. >> the seven weeks to get there. washington love to play this game of setting things that can not beat him. and so saying we're going to try to inspire people and see what comes to it. if republicans went out there and united and say this is a beer that is falling apart, the president has already started delaying part of it. there is a report that came out today, krispy kreme doughnuts, 60% of employees are full-time. 80% of employees have been part- time since january. premiums were going to be $2100 more than expected. we need a timeout from this law. let's go out and fight or that timeout and see where we stand at the end of september. normally when you go into a negotiation you try to preserve option value. you do not take it off the table. incident trying to figure out where we should he, we should fight for something. >> your group recently commissioned a poll regarding who might get blamed in the event that there is a lapse in the appropriations because there is no deal whether it is over obamacare or anything else. i was looking at the questi
to come to washington. there will be those that will miscast this as some great social event. but let us remember 50 years ago some came to washington having rode the back of buses. some came to washington that couldn't stop and buy a cup of coffee until they got across the mason dixon line. some came to washington sleeping in their cars because they couldn't rent a motel room. some came to washington never having had the privilege to vote. some came having seen their friends shed blood. but they came to washington so we could come today in a different time and a different place and we owe them for what we have today. i et a man not long ago, tell it often, he says i'm african american but i don't understand all this civil rights marching you're talking about, reverend al. i've accomplished, i've achieved. look at my resume. i went to the best schools. i'm a member of the right clubs. i had the right people read my resume. civil rights didn't write my resume. i looked at his resume. i said, you're right. civil rights didn't write your resume. but civil rights made somebody ead your resum
approaches this situation is a top priority. "the washington post" published something online that u.s.,s details about the that the budget has grown enormously since 9/11, that the cia is far bigger than outside experts had estimated, that the u.s. is involved in new cyber programs to attack other programs in countries. this information has never been released despite efforts from outside folks. does the president believe this is helpful now and the current climate to have discussion about the details about how the u.s. is spending its money in these departments to get a better understanding, as he said, make the public comfortable with how this money is being spayed and what type of programs are being used? -- that storyhed was published since i walked out here. i'm not in a position to comment on a specific story. the president believes that strengthening public confidence in these programs is important to the success of these programs. there is little debate about the fact these programs are critical to our national security, that they have made a role in protecting the homeland
i frequently tell my washington colleagues -- everything is bigger in texas but me. if you can't see me, you can at least hear me. i was delighted to accept the invitation to speak before the bipartisan policy center for a couple of reasons. number one is because of the outstanding work you have done in the housing arena and number two, i live about re-miles from here so it took me about seven minutes to get here. as a fairly new chairman of a standing committee of congress, i have a number of speaking invitations that come my way. a lot of press is interested in speaking to me me but i assure you, i don't have to work to remain humble. i accept the number of them and my home, i was working on one of those speeches after dinner and my wife who helps keep me humble, comes into my study and says -- ok, in washington, you made me mr. chairman but in dallas, you are mr. dishwasher and they are not getting any cleaner. i took my wife's subtle hand and dropped the speech and went into the kitchen and began to work on the dishes. a few minutes later, the phone rings and she picked it up and
and what is next for the controversial site in nevada tomorrow morning on c-span's "washington journal." thank you for joining us on this sunday. hope you enjoyed the rest of your weekend. "newsmakers" is next. have a great weekend. ♪ >> today on c-span, the ceo of" with heritage for american action, michael needham. john mccainlls with a nancy pelosi. ourelcome to "newsmakers" guest is michael needham. the ceo of heritage action for america. it was founded three years ago. thanks for being our guest. let me introduce our reporters. bob cusack is the managing editor of the hill. .> let's go right to obama care this is the issue that is facing the gop. why do you think republicans can do this? before republicans have funded obama care. the election did not fix much. --may have the democratic the only have democratic control. >> for the last three or four years republicans were all elected on the promise to get rid of obamacare and have relied on someone else coming in and saving the day. the supreme court will come in and rule it unconstitutional. the american people are going
of blacks in the white house. >> yes. >> this is a q&a for a couple of years ago about the martha washington's slave -- pick it up at the end. >> she found out early 1796 that martha washington was planning to give her away as a wedding gift. during slavery, slaves were given away. this was upsetting for her. because when they died, they would free individuals who were slave to them. and she had hoped down the road she would be out of the institution. but if she's going to be given away, that meant her whole life was going to be in slavery. she's going make plans to escape. she writes, she talks about later, one evening, late spring, 1796 while the washingtons were silting at the dinner table waiting for her to serve them, she went out the back door. rather than say, you know, she escaped, we don't like it, but we'll leave it alone. george decides to kidnap her. they send a nephew back to kidnap her which was actually fairly common. >> how many stories in history like this, slaves in the white house? >> many stories. there were african-americans in the white house, except the james buchanan
't it be nice if we had her back in washington now. >> we only skimmed the surface in 90 minutes of 81 entering years of life. if you want to learn more. i thank the white house historical association for their ♪elp in this series. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ >> on c-span tonight, libyan activist discuss. then another chance to watch "first ladies" on the life of dolley madison. >> coming up on the next "washington journal," -- 's tomorrow night, on c-span encore presentation of "first ladies" -- is not>> campaigning allowed. you cannot do that and you cannot ask for office directly. you have used subtle back channels. women were a good conduit for that. come to spread their gossip and ask their favors. she knows she cannot trust these people. she is not naÏve. a lot of them are spreading false information, false gossip, they are misleading and have all of their own agendas. she is aware of the political gain going on and is not a fan. >> the encore presentation continues tomorrow night at 9:00 eastern o
on anniversary of the march on washington, and the legacy of martin luther king jr.. series, first ladies, influence and image. over the next couple of hours, we will visit places with history curators. away fighting the revolutionary war, martha washington ran their plantation. >> it is clear that martha arrived at mount vernon in 1859 and there was a lot of management that she had to do. when she married george washington, she brings with her to mount vernon 12 housemates. that is really almost unimaginable luxury. these are slaves that are for the most part, not field labor, not producing crops, which is where your income is coming from. they are doing things like cooking, serving at table, clean the house, doing the laundry, doing selling, this is not productive labor in the sense that it is not productive income. she brings them with her and she brings financial resources to the marriage as well as her managerial skills. it makes mount vernon a successful operation and it makes it possible for washington to be away for eight years fighting a war. the fact that he has this support sys
night at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span programs on every first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. tonight, sarah polk, mark rhett taylor and abigail fillmore. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] sarah polk was on diplomacy and her strong suit is intelligence and political discussion. >> she made no bones about the fact she took an interest in politics. and that she was her husband's partner. >> she grew naup political household in tennessee. her father was a local politician so she grew up loving politics. she married james after he won a seat in the legislature. because she would not have married him if he had -- >> unfortunately for james k. polk he died three months after leaving the white house. and sarah began a 42-year widowhood. polk place became a shrine to her husband and she would invite anybody who wanted to to come to visit and see the objects she had collected through her long and illustrious political career. >> to live there for many years on her own. during the civil war, generals on both
hope you enjoy the rest of the time in your home district which you prefer to washington but we look forward to having you back there for the important work ahead. thank you. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national >> on satellite corp. 2013] the next washington journal, the that end challenges facing the country. we will talk to robert bixby. and as part of our cargo ship from kaiser health news, julie appleby on the administration's to station is to delay limits on out-of-pocket expenses for people buying health insurance. and a ruling on the nuclear .egulatory commission's review in washington correspondent of the las vegas sun. "washington journal," live at 7 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> what is interesting about washington in this age is that once you have that title, even if it is a very short title, even if you have been voted out after one term, you can stay in washington and be a former chief of staff, a former congressman, a former chief of staff to congressman x or y. that is marketable. you are in the club. that is a s
be the secretary of dhs is the most thankless job in washington. that is not true. no doubt, it is a very big and comics job. it is literally a 24/7 job, that as my successor will soon learn, it is also one of the most rewarding jobs there is. what you do hear matters to the lives of people all across our great nation him and your decisions affect them in direct and tangible ways. you make sure their families are safe from terrorist threats, that their local first responders have equipment and training and funding, and that when disaster strikes people who have lost everything are given food and shelter and hope. and that thanks for that is not owed any single individual or cabinet secretary, but to that 240,000 dhs employees, many of whom work in tough conditions around the clock to accomplish our shared and noble mission, and that includes some who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our country. they are the backbone of your nation's homeland security, and over the past 4 1/2 years, it has been my pleasure to serve with them and build a more agile department of homeland security. i thank
at the 1963 march on washington for jobs on freedom. "he has got the whole world in his hands. >> let us listen please to the words of this song and understand that in the heart of our creator, every soul has the same value and should be valued equally. thank you very much for the opportunity to sing for you. ♪ he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole wide world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. [singing "he's got the whole ♪orld in his hands"] ♪ [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the speaker of the united states house of representatives, the honorable john boehner. >> how about a round of applause? [applause] let me thank my colleagues for their testimonials and express my gratitude to all the members of staff of the congressional black caucus in their assistance planning this ceremony. we have many guests. the mayor is here. our attorney general is here. we want to welcome all of you. right now, i have the distinct honor of introducing a great patriot, the recipient of the presidential medal of freedom, a
communicators." how did you get this gig? >> reviewing tech products? i was a washington reporter for about 20 years and i'm still based in washington but i do not cover washington anymore. in those years, before i did tech i covered national security, the state department, economicsce agencies, , organized labor, environment, deputy bureau chief of "wall street journal." i picked up technology, computers as a hobby. 1980 -- 1981 and in 1991, at my request, i decided that the paper allowed me to switch what i was doing. even though i physically remained here in washington, i began an entirely different gig reviewing these tech products, not just hardware but software, , anything consumer that was digital. and i've been doing that for 23 years. >> if you give something a bad review, it doesn't affect sales of that product? does, but i do not think it always does. it has been written not by me but by others that if i give a good review of it will boost sales of the product. the best comparison is to a movie reviewer. the best movie reviewers will give sterling reviews to some movies that have a
-span. programs on every first lady, from martha washington. tonight, elizabeth munro and catherine adams. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ >> elizabeth monroe was a true partner in her husband's career. they were a love story and absolutely devoted to each other. elizabeth monroe had a well- developed sense of style and image. this is a woman who knew how to carry herself with great elegance. >> it is called the era of good feeling. >> this is a woman who spoke french. >> very great beauty. she received is seldom anything in the white house. she hated it. >> dignity, civility. those are the words that come to mind. >> elizabeth monroe served as first lady from 1817 to 1825 as a time known as the era of good feeling. coming up, we will explore her life and what were not always happy times inside the white house for this woman born into a well-to-do new york family. she married james monroe at the age of 17 and traveled new york extensively with him. she brought with her to the white house a certain french
martha washington's slave. out in 1796,ound that martha washington was planning to give her away. during the planning, slaves were away. this was upsetting, because the washington's had promised to free their slaves when they died. and she was going to be given away, that meant that she was going to be in slavery. she may plan to escape. she talks about this later, one whenng, in 1796, washington was sitting at the dinner table, literally, waiting for them to serve him, she escaped. she -- george decides that they are going to kidnap her. that was fairly common. >> how many stories are there like this? >> many. there were always african americans in the white house. james buchanan's administration. were upset.ners he dismissed the african- american staff and brought in irish and english house servants. that is the only time that happened. left the hercules, washington compound and was never found again. they think he was in new york. they do not know. not a lot of effort was made to find him. hise is trouble about slaves and hers. he freed his and he did not free hers. i do not know the
morning, august 15. ahead on the "washington journal ," your reaction to the latest development in egypt and what the u.s. response should be. you should join the conversation at (202) 585-3880, our line for republicans. (202) 585-3881 for democrats. we also have our line for independents at (202) 585-3882. join us on facebook, send us a tweet, or e-mail address, journal@c-span.org. at somegin with a look of the headlines from outside the u.s., the "guardian" newspaper -- egypt's bloody crackdown. when the story first went to prince, the death toll was 200 78. overnight, the death toll has been updated to 421. there is this from the "miami killed asundreds egypt's forces storm the protest camps. a similar headline from "usa today," egypt the reps in chaos. -- a reps and chaos. from the "wall street journal" website -- egypt's military regime a reps setting off a day of violence that left at least 421 people dead. the government fractured and ties with its international partners in tatters. cairo streets were calm this morning following the curfew overnight with funerals for the dead. fur
. ♪ [applause] >> thank you. 50 years ago, they did not take a bus outing to come to washington. there will be those that will miscast this as some great social event. but let us remember 50 years ago some came to washington having rode the back of buses. some came to washington that couldn't stop and buy a cup of coffee until they got across the mason dixon line. some came to washington sleeping in their cars because they couldn't rent a motel room. some came to washington never having had the privilege to vote. some came having seen their friends shed blood. but they came to washington so we could come today in a different time and a different place and we owe them for what we have today. [applause] i met a man not long ago, i tell it often, he says i'm african american but i don't understand all this civil rights marching you're talking about, reverend al. i've accomplished, i've achieved. look at my resume. i went to the best schools. i'm a member of the right clubs. i had the right people read my resume. civil rights didn't write my resume. i looked at his resume. i said, y
think about the march on washington they only think about the dream speech and that part of the speech. they don't think about anything else and you are right. he said a lot harsher things than anyone talked about. this is including the absence of women on the stage on purpose. they even missed the dream part of the speech. they were looking so much for the violence that they did not see it. i'm wondering how they thought, with anyen there, notice that they've missed the story. >> i want to address media coverage on the march on washington and i remember the three major networks were there. withoutered it interruption and they broadcasted it to europe. "the washington post" assign more than 60 reporters to cover that story. it was really big news. a congressman, you said that the civil rights movement without the media would be like a bird without wings. what did you mean? >> i meant that. >> i know you did, but tell us what you meant. without the media, especially in the american south, without reporters, without the photographer, without the cameras to bring the message .nto the livi
which found the unemployment rate went up in 28 state and declined in eight states. "washington journal" is next. >> the president's plan to try to keep college more affordable is already getting some reaction from capitol hill. we might have to weigh in. some are in support and some are critical saying the new ranging system that the president put out is arbitrary. meantime college can cost up to $30,000 year on average now for some folks and the debt load students carrying can be the same amount. with that background is the cost of college worth it? that's the question for you this friday morning. republicans call 202-585-3881, democrats 202-585-3880 and independents 202-585-3882. look forward to your calls and also your participation by social media. you can send us a tweet at twitter @c-span wj. you can also send an e-mail journal@c-span.org. is the cost of college worth it? allen writes, it used to be but right now it slightly losing steam. now people that are caught with a minimum of expectations while being strapped with a new burden of paying back the loan making short m
anniversary of the march on washington. wasn't it exciting to see the enthusiasm and the film of the people of the day? who could have expected so many of us would be here who had ties to all that was owing on? who could suspect that we would all be with john lewis? [applause] attorney general, mr. mayor, you honor us with your presence. .he fierce urgency of now words rang out across the national mall, the call echoed in households across america. the summons ignited a movement to make real the promise of democracy. of course everyone knows the "i had a dream" speech, but the fierce urgency of now part of it was not only an inspiration, it was a motivation to act. was not the first time dr. martin luther king jr. urged fellow travelers to reject the status quo, to in his words at the march, refuse to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. seven years early now to trim of in francisco, my hometown, 1956, dr. king delivered the same message to the delegates of the naacp convention. --said "now i realize those all over are telling us we must slow up, he said, but we cannot afford this slo
of been explored in every administration i have seen in washington since the 1980's. >> we will take one or two more calls, and then wrap things up with our guest. these -- caller: lobbyists, i think they ought to be outlawed. is just bribery, if you think about it. it is just bribery, paying off the politicians, putting money in their pockets for what their goal is, not the people's goal. that is what i have to say. host: is there any aspect of this we have not talked about that you want to bring up, anything else we should know? guest: not really. i think it has been good to hear the opinions of people in the real world about this, and about the presidential stuff. it gives us something to think about. guest: maybe it is something we can think about. the reuters washington bureau chief. thank you for your time. >> we take you live now to dublin, new hampshire. this is a fundraiser with texas senator ted cruz, one of the candidates we might see run for president in 2016. the chair of the new hampshire gop will introduce senator kelly ontte, and then we will move to ted cruz's remarks. t
one. span, we bring a public affair of events from washington to you. white house readings and conferences. gaveling complete gavel-to- coverage of the house. c-span, created by the cable tv industry 34 years ago and funded by your local cable or satellite provider. now, you can watch us in hd. >> a look at the unfolding situation in syria and how humanitarian efforts are being carried out. million refugees have left for neighboring countries. from washington journal, this is 20 minutes. host: joining us next is dr. ron waldman, president of doctors of the world usa, joining us to talk about the group's activities among the world with refugees, in particular the syrian refugee camp from which he has recently returned. thank you for being with us. this is a photo in this week's "new york" magazine with an article and a photograph of a camp. it is open two weeks. it is now home to 120,000 people. the population of hartford, conn. you were recently at this camp. it looks like largely a tent city. what was your experience like? guest: a very large encampment of refugees. it is
. way before i started researching him.article, i ran into a social event. there are many in washington, d.c. nikita mr. thompson, i'm stewart. i said do you think we could talk now? remember he said, no. >> how old is he? >> 58. is he from? >> from jamaica in the perish of st. elizabeth. >> how did he get to the united states? >> he moved here with his father other siblings before he moved here, his mother had come here. and two of his siblings passed away and she was upset according family members and she needed to get away. she decided to come to d.c. to and then theatives rest of her family followed her a few years later. how old was he when he came to the united states. >> he was only 19 years old. he -- he had an education in jamaica. nothing that would really united states. so he had to start from scratch and earn a g.e.d. and went to university of the district of columbia. >> who was the first person he met in the united states who made the connections and went on have with the politicians? > several people he met along the way. i don't know if i can pinpoint the first person. h
th anniversary of the march on washington. [applause] >> 50 years ago there was not a single woman on the program. today we are honored to have not just one young person but several young people on the program today. it is certainly a tribute to the work and legacy of so many people that have gone on before us. 50 years ago today, in a symbolic shadow of abraham lincoln my father stood in this very spot and declared to this nation his dream to let freedom ring all the people being manacled by a system of discrimination. he commissioned us to go back to our various cities, towns, hamlets, states and villages and let freedom ring. the reverberation of the sound of that freedom message has amplified and echoed since 1963 through the decades and coast to coast throughout this nation and even around the world. and as we are summoned again back to these hallowed grounds to send out a clarion call to let freedom ring. since that time, as a result of the civil rights act of 1964, voting rights act of 1965, the fair housing act of 1968, we have witnessed great strides toward freedom for al
march on y of the washington. we will be joined by clarence lusane. ♪ashingt"washington journal" is. host: the lincoln memorial, a key part of the march 50 years ago, a key part of the event today. commemorating the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. live coverage starts at nine on c-span three, part of american history tv. we will devote part of this program to the topic of the march, as well as the civil rights act. for the first 45 minutes we are turning to politics. john boehner, in a conference call with republican lawmakers, told a group he plans to craft a short-term bill that would fund the government, avoiding a government shutdown. for our next 45 minutes, we are interested in hearing from republicans only. the acttalk about itself, the larger implications of the funding of the health- care law, but we want to get your thoughts on our phone line. here's how you can do so. it is republicans only. if you live in the eastern and central time zone, it is 202- 585-3880. if you live in the pacific or mountain time zone, it is 202- 585-3881. you can reach us on twitter
to politics. i spent a semester in washington with my school, colgate university. i saw washington and i thought, a think tank might be an exciting place to be. i know people don't think of think tanks as being exciting. so the center of american progress was starting up one of my professors gave me a new york magazine article about it. it was new, aggressive, it was a think tank but sort of wasn't your grandmother's think tank. so i decided to apply for an internship at the center for american progress. it was great, it was a lot of fun. it was pushing a progressive agenda like many think tanks haven't been. it was trying to change the message to show that progressives weren't all week on national security. showing religious voters could be progressive. it was trying to change things. >> where has this idea come from in your life? >> my family -- in part because i grew up in a small village in upstate new york under about 1,000 people. i'm adopted. i'm from korea. my siblings are also adopted. my one brother is african-american. the other brother is correia. my parents are white. my fat
trump speaking at the leadership >> this week on "q and a," washington post reporter nikita stewart discusses her recent front-page profile of washington see -- washington, d.c. businessman gerald washington. >> nikita stewart, as a reporter for the washington post, on july 13, you wrote a huge fees, front-page, on a man named jeffrey thompson. why? our local businessman at the center of major federal investigation and no one really knew who we was. so i basically told my editor i want to write the definitive profile of jeffrey thompson. when people want to know about him, they want -- i want them to refer back to this article. >> what we want to know about him? >> right now, he is the center of d.c. politics and some folks say he is actually at the center of d.c. all addiction basically falling apart. for years, behind-the-scenes, he had been giving to candidates. he had several contracts coming huge contracts with the city, one worth $22 million year. and no one really knew who he things came to light the011 over problems with current mayors. -- the current mayors campaign in 2010
. "washington journal" is next. ♪ good morning. august 12, 20 13. attorney general eric holder is set to announce that low-level, nonviolent drug offenders will no longer be charged minimum mandatory sentence -- sentences. it is part of an overall package to reform american prisons. he will make the remarks at the american bar association today in san francisco. we want to begin there. what is your take on the attorney general's proposal to reform the prison system in this country? republicans -- democrats -- independents -- you can send us a tweet if you go to twitter.com @cspanwj. on our facebook page, facebook.com/c-span. or e-mail us. we will begin with the front page of the "washington post" -- this is what the attorney general is going to propose, that low-level, nonviolent drug offenders with no ties to gangs or large-scale drug organizations will no longer be charged with offenses that impose severe mandatory sentences. it goes on to say it goes on to say we want to get your thoughts on this. what do you think about the attorney general setting this forward? this is his goal.
washington directly to you, putting you in the room at congressional hearings, white house events, briefings, and conferences and offering complete apple to gavel coverage of the u.s. house, all as a public service of private industry. we are c-span, created by the cable tv industry 35 years ago and funded by your local cable and satellite provider. .ow, you can watch us in hd >> turning to serious health -- the u.s. has confirmed it has reached an agreement with the syrian government to allow inspectors to visit the site of an alleged emma: attack a suite near damascus. the date and times still need to be worked out. opposition groups and doctors without borders say more than 300 people were killed. u.s. lawmakers talked about those attacks on the sunday news shows. on fox news sunday, corker and eliot talk more about the issue. i think we will respond in a surgical way and i hope the president, as soon as we get back to washington, will ask for authorization from congress to do something in a very surgical and proportional way, something that gets their attention and causes them to underst
is speak the truth. secondly, there is a new generation of leaders stepping forward in washington. new, young at leaders, people like rand paul and marco rubio and mike lee and kelly ayotte. [applause] you know what is incredible? five years ago, not one of them was in office. you have to go back to after world war ii to see an instance where the generation of leaders who were effectively defending free-market principles is a new generation stepping forward -- let me suggest something. if you look at that new generation, they are almost always exactly the same age. was 10 whence, i ronald reagan became president. i was 18 when ronald reagan left the white house. know how for the world war ii generation, many of them would prefer to fdr as "our president?" i will go to my grave with ronald reagan defining what it means to be present. -- president. [applause] he didn't blink. i have referred to this next generation, this new generation as the children of reagan. listen to them communicate. listen to kelly stand up and talk about free-market principles. listen to marco. listen to rent. --
canceled his meeting with russian president vladimir putin. that is all next on "washington journal." ♪ is sunday,orning, it august 11 come up 20 13. it is today, resident obama began his week long vacation at martha's vineyard. today we will be discussing the state of u.s. relations with dive intoking a deep u.s. job numbers, and talking about recent al qaeda threats. before we do that we want to hear about the state of news media from our viewers. the pew research center's -- you research center released its biannual data and while there is still plenty of criticism about the industry, most americans continue to believe the media plays an important watchdog role. as we take you through that reports this morning, we want to hear your thoughts. he of us a call. we split our lineup -- we split our lines up by age group. you can also catch up with us on all of your favorite social media sites, on twitter and facebook. you can also e-mail us at .ww.c-span.org we want to take you to that report that was released on thursday by the pew research center for the people. public valuations
perez. o'bryan.teve ♪ tot: good morning, welcome "the washington journal." we are in the waning days of a congressional recess and members of congress are gearing up for this fall's legislative agenda. a question for all of you this morning, what is your message to house and senate lawmakers as they prepare to turn to -- returned to washington next month. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. also send as a tweet, if you go to twitter.com/c-spanwj or post your comments on facebook.com/cspan or e-mail us at journal@c-span.org. a piece this morning from janet hauck, a town hall meetings happening across the country, this is what she reports -- of color that is a bit on what is happening in town hall meetings across the country. here on c-span we have been those town hall meetings and if you are interested in watching them, you can go to c-span.org. before we came up live here we were showing you a recent town hall meeting with congressman justin [indiscernible] a republican who many of you know is against the nsa program. nsa,
's daylong march on washington, celebrating 19630th anniversary of the march on washington. welcome to "washington journal" on the sunday, august 25, 2013. we will play you a couple of more comments from yesterday's speech. the question this morning, does new technology create better jobs? we will show you the opinion piece that is prompting our question. here are a couple of ways to participate in the discussion, as usual. by phone -- make sure you mute your television or radio when you call in. you can reach us on twitter or facebook. or send journal@c-span.org us an e-mail, the e-mail address is -- or send us an e-mail, the address is journal@c-span.org. the front page this morning of t,"e washington pos the headline -- part of the reporting this morning area did president obama will be speaking on the actual anniversary day at the lincoln memorial. that is coming up on wednesday. here's the front page of the new york times and their front page photo from the march yesterday -- e froml play you mor that. comeshnology and jobs, it in an opinion peas from "the new york times," wri
at washington. lastwas held hostage december, and i thought i was going to be added to this list. i was lucky after five unpleasant days. i got out. there was a gun battle and a rescue and i managed to escape. i was rescued and escaped. i returned to syria last week for the first time since being kidnapped, and instead of having list, iadded to this have the honor of paying respect to my colleagues who did not make it, and i would like to thank the newseum for that privilege. the question is, why do we do it? why take the risks? is it for fun, ford venture? -- for adventure? is it for the money? there are easier ways to make money than this. like the earth's plates when they snap like violent political change, and we see how the plates are fitting together. we do so the innocents have a voice. we do it because we have decided this is what we want to do with our slice of time on this planet. event back in may. all of the available in our field library at www.c-span.org. looking live at the iwo jima memorial just outside washington based on the photograph by joseph rosenthal in 1945. it was the
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